Common Resume Misconceptions

August 30, 2016

 

Whether you're revisiting your resume after 10 years or creating one for the first time, falling victim to common resume misconceptions can send anyone down the wrong path. In the ever-changing job market, it's important to stay up to date with the rules of the game (and be willing to bend a little and create your own along the way!) Check out the a few misconceptions I've come across when designing resumes.

 

I SHOULD LIST EVERY JOB I'VE EVER HAD

 

Just because a resume's function is to provide your skills and job history doesn't mean that you're obligated to list every job you've ever had. When applying for positions specific to your industry, you want to list the positions you've held that apply to your current industry. If you're in the entry-level phase, list positions where your accomplishments and tasks would be most applicable to your current industry. Choosing to list industry specific positions saves space and saves potential employers time while viewing your resume.

 

I NEED TO WRITE A PARAGRAPH FOR EACH POSITION

 

 

Keep it short and sweet! You don't need to list every task you had while working as a barista at a big name coffee shop, just the important ones. You want potential employers to see the stuff that really matters, not fluff. The best plan for this section is to list the ways you personally contributed to the company.

 

I NEED TO LIST PERSONAL SKILLS

 

 

So you're responsible, reliable, timely and more patient than most... just like the next candidate says they are. Employers care more about what you can do and what technical skills you can bring to the table. Instead of getting personal on your resume, keep it professional by listing your areas of expertise regarding your industry.

 

I NEED TO INCLUDE AN OBJECTIVE

 

 

Gone are the days when the first thing your employer should see is, 'Seeking a full-time position in X industry that will allow me to...'. You're applying for the job, so it's pretty obvious that your objective involves securing the position. To get a better, more in-depth sense of your goals, employers will look to your cover letter. Leave the space on your resume for something else.

 

MY RESUME NEEDS TO BE BLACK AND WHITE

 

 

Your resume is a professional reflection of you, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it has to be black and white. There are several ways to incorporate color into your resume that add a personal touch. Depending on your industry, opting for more color could be the element that sets you apart from other candidates and lands you in the 'interview' pile.

 

 

 

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